Most doctors aren't discussing meningitis B vaccine as college outbreaks continue

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College dorms are a hotbed for the transmission of meningitis, which can be deadly.

A. Pawlowski
August 20, 2018
TODAY

SUMMARY

As colleges continue to grapple with outbreaks of Meningitis B on campus, a new survey finds few doctors are discussing the vaccine for the disease with their young patients and their parents.

Only 51 percent of pediatricians and 31 percent of family physicians reported initiating a conversation about the MenB vaccine during routine visits for 16-18 year olds — the preferred ages for the shot, the study published Monday in Pediatrics found. More than 900 doctors were surveyed for the paper.

“Not all physicians believe this should be routinely given since it is a rare disease and there is limited experience with the longevity and safety of the vaccines,” Dr. Allison Kempe, the lead author and professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, told TODAY. “Therefore not all will bring it up.”

Read the full article "Most doctors aren't discussing meningitis B vaccine as college outbreaks continue" from TODAY.

Emma Harrison